Arctic Blog

Daily updates on what the fork I'm up to and also the news I see fit to report.

Saturday, June 17, 2006

Steak/Game Diane

This is a super easy recipe for a very flavorful beef, (or preferably game animal,) dish that that involves fire while cooking. The fire does not much effect the taste of the food, as much as the sauce. The fire is mainly to burn off some of the alcohol, to enhance the taste.

Ingrediants are:

1/2" thickness or so piece of beef, (I usually use striploin,) or venison tenderloin
Port Wine (cheapest you can find) about 3 Oz
Shallot - One whole diced
Butter about 2 Oz cut into 3 pieces
(optional) Brandy (cheapest you can find)
Parsley 2 sprigs

Here is what ya do...
Heat ya saute pan, melt the first pat of butter, toss in the steak, (watch it, since it is so thin you will be able to see it turn from red to grey up the side.) When it gets about 1/3 up the side, (probably a minute or two if ya pan was hot,) flip it and repeat on the other side, some where along the line you will probably want to toss in the second pat of butter. Then remove the meat from the pan. You will now have hot fat in the pan, toss in the shallots. Stir them a lot until them start to give off water. The next step is to pour in the port, but before you do so make sure your pan is hot, (it has to be hot enough to vaporise some fo the alcohol.) What you do next depends... assuming you have a gas stove you just tip you pan towards the flame and let it burn, if you have electric you will have to introduce an outside source of fire, like a lighter. If you are using gas and ya pan doesnt light when ya tip it, it means ya didn't get it hot enough, just let it get hotter then burn it. (Flaminging burns out about 50% of the alcohol and makes the taste a lot better.) Let the port reduce to about 1/2 of its original volume over medium heat, (if it is too hot the sauce will separate to fat, water, and solids.) Once it is reduced add the brandy and light it again. Once the flame burns off the alcohol, put the meat back in the pan and saute over medium heat briefly, about a minute, then serve.

Anyway I promised to teach flambeing, so i have to some extent, email me if ya want more.

Steak/Game Diane

This is a super easy recipe for a very flavorful beef, (or preferably game animal,) dish that that involves fire while cooking. The fire does not much effect the taste of the food, as much as the sauce. The fire is mainly to burn off some of the alcohol, to enhance the taste.

Ingrediants are:

1/2" thickness or so piece of beef, (I usually use striploin,) or venison tenderloin
Port Wine (cheapest you can find) about 3 Oz
Shallot - One whole diced
Butter about 2 Oz cut into 3 pieces
(optional) Brandy (cheapest you can find)
Parsley 2 sprigs

Here is what ya do...
Heat ya saute pan, melt the first pat of butter, toss in the steak, (watch it, since it is so thin you will be able to see it turn from red to grey up the side.) When it gets about 1/3 up the side, (probably a minute or two if ya pan was hot,) flip it and repeat on the other side, some where along the line you will probably want to toss in the second pat of butter. Then remove the meat from the pan. You will now have hot fat in the pan, toss in the shallots. Stir them a lot until them start to give off water. The next step is to pour in the port, but before you do so make sure your pan is hot, (it has to be hot enough to vaporise some fo the alcohol.) What you do next depends... assuming you have a gas stove you just tip you pan towards the flame and let it burn, if you have electric you will have to introduce an outside source of fire, like a lighter. If you are using gas and ya pan doesnt light when ya tip it, it means ya didn't get it hot enough, just let it get hotter then burn it. The flaming doesn't much effect the taste of the food as much as it does the sauce. Flaminging burns out about 50% of the alcohol and makes the taste a lot better.

Anyway I promised to teach flambeing, so i have to some extent, email me if ya want more.

Steak/Game Diane

This is a super easy recipe for a very flavorful beef, (or preferably game animal,) dish that that involves fire while cooking. The fire does not much effect the taste of the food, as much as the sauce. The fire is mainly to burn off some of the alcohol, to enhance the taste.

Ingrediants are:

1/2" thickness or so piece of beef, (I usually use striploin,) or venison tenderloin
Port Wine (cheapest you can find) about 3 Oz
Shallot - One whole diced
Butter about 2 Oz cut into 3 pieces
(optional) Brandy (cheapest you can find)
Parsley 2 sprigs

Here is what ya do...
Heat ya saute pan, melt the first pat of butter, toss in the steak, (watch it, since it is so thin you will be able to see it turn from red to grey up the side.) When it gets about 1/3 up the side, (probably a minute or two if ya pan was hot,) flip it and repeat on the other side, some where along the line you will probably want to toss in the second pat of butter. Then remove the meat from the pan. You will now have hot fat in the pan, toss in the shallots. Stir them a lot until them start to give off water. The next step is to pour in the port, but before you do so make sure your pan is hot, (it has to be hot enough to vaporise some fo the alcohol.) What you do next depends... assuming you have a gas stove you just tip you pan towards the flame and let it burn, if you have electric you will have to introduce an outside source of fire, like a lighter. If you are using gas and ya pan doesnt light when ya tip it, it means ya didn't get it hot enough, just let it get hotter then burn it. The flaming doesn't much effect the taste of the food as much as it does the sauce. Flaminging burns out about 50% of the alcohol and makes the taste a lot better.

Anyway I promised to teach flambeing, so i have to some extent, email me if ya want more.

Sunday, June 11, 2006

Need Interviewees

As I mentioned in my profile I have a degree in East Asian Studies. Although I am now in the industry of cooking, I have decided to write another paper in the field, to expand upon my thesis, Which compared foxes in Japanese folklore to foxes in Japanese modern entertainment, (specifically anime and manga, the former of which you can find even in primetime TV and the latter of which outsells books monthly. It is an entertainment for all people there.) I have decided I will write a new paper comparing the typical view of foxes in Japan and the US, (because thats where I live.) I am going to interview a number of people for my information, but what I really need are Japanese people, or people of Japanese descent. Now I know no one reads this but I'm going to ask anyway, if you know any people that qualify as the latter of the two, and wouldn't mind being interviewed by email, please tell me. I would be super grateful. My thanks.

Recipe

I'm a chef after all, how could I not post a few recipes for some of my favorite, yet surprisingly simple, foods?

Xinjiang Style lamb kebabs
The semi-autonomous province of NW China is populated largely by Uighurs who are originally of Turkish descent and are Muslim. As such they don't use pork which is highly prevalent in typical Chinese cooking.
This "recipe" is not very specific in proportions because when I made it I was trying to emulate the flavor of the lamb kebabs I bought from street vendors while I was in China. So more or less adjust to taste.

Lamb meat cut into relatively small cubes, about 1/2 inch (I use leg because its relatively inexpensive and still rather tender)

Spice mix (like I said its not exactly specific amounts, just make enough to coat the meat)
1 part Salt
1 part Black Pepper
1 part Rosemary ground
3 parts Cayenne Pepper
5 parts Cumin

Mix spices together, skewer the lamb cubes. Cook on a hot grill, rotate every 20-30 seconds. Sprinkle the spices over the lamb after about 1 minute of cooking, make sure to coat it. The skewers should only take 2-3 minutes to cook completely. Very flavorful, very hot. This is about as close as I could get to the real thing, eat them and think of the other faces of China.

Saturday, June 10, 2006

Via the NY Times
Three detainees being held at the United States military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, committed suicide early on Saturday,

And this is progress in fighting the war on terror I suppose right? I mean if they killed themselves they must have been terrorists no? Oh, and we don't torture them either that had nothing to do with this.

Guess I'll start this off...

I know noone is ever going to read this but, I have to start somewhere so I'll talk about myself.
My name is Dan Mohrman, I have a BA in East Asian Studies, speak a very small amount of Japanese, am currently learning to be a chef, and write overly long sentences with too many commas. I live in Portland, Oregon. I am very aware of, (but also cynically questioning,) the news, and I daily read the NY Times and Washington Post. Politically I am a very left leaning democrat. I do however, find blogs to be a far better source of up to date news then the MSM is. Ah well, after this I will just post stuff from time to time, whatever seems interesting in the news. This will reflect both my political and social views.